Category Archives: Lunar Science

Polar “Lava Tubes”

An abstract at the recent “Landed Science for Landed Missions Workshop” (and subsequent press release) from the SETI Institute claiming the discovery of lava tubes near the north pole of the Moon has gotten a lot of media play.  The … Continue reading

Posted in Lunar development, Lunar exploration, Lunar Science | 11 Comments

How Much Water is on the Moon?

I have a new post up at Air & Space that discusses the techniques used to sense water remotely and the amounts of water that may be found in the lunar polar regions.  This post was motivated in part by … Continue reading

Posted in Lunar development, Lunar exploration, Lunar Science | 14 Comments

Inconstant Moon

I’d like to point readers’ attention to this wonderful visualization tool produced by the Scientific Visualization Studio at NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Project.  It’s a program that reproduces the Moon’s phase, position in its orbit, … Continue reading

Posted in Lunar exploration, Lunar Science, space technology | 8 Comments

Humans and Robots — Again

I continue my musings on this perennial topic (and its relevance to the recent Presidential announcement) in a new post at Air & Space.  Comment here, if desired.

Posted in Lunar development, Lunar exploration, Lunar Science, Philosophy of science, planetary exploration, space policy, space technology | 15 Comments

Take a Step on Another World

I have a new piece up at Air & Space on what it will be like to live and work on the Moon.  Comments welcome.

Posted in Lunar exploration, Lunar Science, space policy, space technology | 11 Comments

Are Humans Needed on the Moon?

During my recent appearance on The Space Show, a caller questioned the need for people on the Moon. If teleoperated robots can be used to mine resources, manufacture useful products, and set up a lunar outpost, as I have proposed, … Continue reading

Posted in Lunar exploration, Lunar Science, Philosophy of science, planetary exploration, space policy, space technology | 23 Comments

Jack Schmitt’s Lunar Memories

Apollo 17 Lunar Module Pilot and Geologist Harrison H. (Jack) Schmitt has posted a new item on his web site: the beginning of a reminiscence of his historic flight, which departed for the Moon 44 years and 11 months ago … Continue reading

Posted in Lunar exploration, Lunar Science, space technology, Space transportation | 4 Comments

Why We Go To The Moon – A Mission Statement

I have a new blog post up at Air & Space on the need for a “mission statement” for our return to the lunar surface.  I advocated this during the VSE days, but lost that argument.  I believe this to … Continue reading

Posted in Lunar development, Lunar exploration, Lunar Science, Philosophy of science, space policy, space technology, Space transportation | 17 Comments

Thoughts on the Job of NASA Administrator

The White House announcement of the nomination of Rep. Jim Bridenstine (R- OK) for NASA Administrator drew some immediate and rather surprising (to me, anyway) reactions. Senators Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Bill Nelson (D-FL), whose state is critically involved in … Continue reading

Posted in Lunar development, Lunar exploration, Lunar Science, space policy, Space transportation | 18 Comments

Ashes and Water

Lots of media coverage this week on newly analyzed spectra showing elevated amounts of water in lunar dark mantling (pyroclastic) ash deposits.  I discuss the new finding and what it might mean in a new post over at Air & … Continue reading

Posted in Lunar development, Lunar exploration, Lunar Science | 13 Comments